False Memories of Fabricated Political Events

False memory is more prevalent than we think False memory is more prevalent than we think

I stumbled across an interesting topic on the CODOH Revisionist Forum called False memories and the “misinformation effect”, and I’ve managed to find a contemporary study dealing with this and thought I’d share it.

The thing here is that Holocaust Revisionists — or people who simply don’t believe in the Holocaust — are often tackled with illogical questions such as “Why would they lie?” and similar ones. Well, here’s one answer:

Approximately half the participants falsely remembered that the false event happened, with 27% remembering that they saw the events happen on the news. Political orientation appeared to influence the formation of false memories, with conservatives more likely to falsely remember seeing Barack Obama shaking hands with the president of Iran, and liberals more likely to remember George W. Bush vacationing with a baseball celebrity during the Hurricane Katrina disaster. [1]

Read more:

False Memories of Fabricated Political Events

So really, lying, the monetary reasons, and doing it purely for vicious defamation are not the only reasons for people (or “survivors” in this example) to somehow think they’ve seen, heard or even personally experienced the most fantastic of things;  here we have it on print that people can “remember” things that never happened, or which they never experienced…or do people really believe the Germans made bacon or soup (yes: not soap) from Jews?

 

“Holocaust survivor” Herman Rosenblat: “It was real in my mind”

 

Sources

  •  Frenda, Steven J., Knowles, Eric D., Saletan, William and Loftus, Elizabeth F., False Memories of Fabricated Political Events (January 16, 2013). Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 49, 2013; UC Irvine School of Law Research Paper No. 2013-87. [k0nsl’s PDF Archive]
  • Rosenblat info. via DZ and DN.
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